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Argentina

Yearbook 2007

Argentina. The October 28 presidential election was historically in many ways. For the first time, the two main candidates were women and consequently a woman was also elected president, the fourth in Latin American history. Senator Cristina Fernández de Krichner from the ruling coalition Frente para la Victoria (FPV) won with 45 percent of the votes cast. The election result was attributed to a number of factors - the good economy, the crucial importance of the Province of Buenos Aires (with 40 percent of the electoral votes), a divided opposition, but above all the popularity that surrounded Fernández de Kirchner's husband, the incumbent President Néstor Kirchner. The victory margin was the largest since the reintroduction of democracy in Argentina in 1983, and in some parts of northern Argentina Fernández de Kirchner received as much as 70 percent of the vote. In contrast, she had weaker support in the larger cities, where the middle class tended to vote for the main competitor Elisa Carrió from the left coalition Coalición Cívica. However, a dark shadow fell over the election result - turnout was only 73 percent, which is the lowest since democracy was reinstated. At the same time, elections were held for half of the seats in the House of Representatives and a third of the Senate and provincial governorships. There, too, the government noted great successes. The FPV gained its own majority in the House of Representatives through an increase from 111 seats to 137, and in the Senate the government parties received 47 of 72 seats, ie. only a mandate from the two-thirds majority. which is the lowest since democracy was reinstated. At the same time, elections were held for half of the seats in the House of Representatives and a third of the Senate and provincial governorships. There, too, the government noted great successes. The FPV gained its own majority in the House of Representatives through an increase from 111 seats to 137, and in the Senate the government parties received 47 of 72 seats, ie. only a mandate from the two-thirds majority. which is the lowest since democracy was reinstated. At the same time, elections were held for half of the seats in the House of Representatives and a third of the Senate and provincial governorships. There, too, the government noted great successes. According to CountryAAH, the FPV gained its own majority in the House of Representatives through an increase from 111 seats to 137, and in the Senate the government parties received 47 of 72 seats, ie. only a mandate from the two-thirds majority.

2007 Argentina

The government coalition also won all eight remaining provincial elections, including in the important Buenos Aires province where Vice President Daniel Scioli's victory also contributed to Fernández de Kirchner's victory nationally.

Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is not the first female president in Argentina's history, nor the first to succeed her husband. In 1974, Juan Perón, founder of the spouses Kirchner's party Partido Justicialista, was succeeded by his wife Isabel. Ironically, just this year, judicial authorities demanded that Isabel Perón be extradited from Spain where she has lived in exile since the 1970s. She is accused of supporting a right-wing death squadron that is believed to be behind the disappearance of 600 people during her brief presidential period 1974–76.

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