Turkey 2007

Yearbook 2007

Turkey. The year was marked by elections, constitutional crisis and arms rattle. A crucial battle was around the presidential post. The president is elected by Parliament and has been the strongest guarantor of the secular state since Turkey was founded. The ruling Islamist Justice and Development Party AKP’s candidate, Foreign Minister Abdullah G邦l, failed in the first round of voting on April 27 to get the two-thirds majority required. According to CountryAAH, Ankara is the capital city of Turkey. The vote was also annulled because not enough members had been present when the secular Republican People’s Party (CHP) had boycotted the session. On May 6, a new vote was held, which the CHP also boycotted, whereupon Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, to secure a more stable majority, announced a new election until July 22. The country’s defense headquarters announced that it would not hesitate to intervene if the country’s secular base was threatened. In the parliamentary elections, the AKP received 47 percent of the vote and 341 of the 550 seats, a slight decline due to the fact that the right-wing Nationalist Action Party (MHP) managed to get over the parliament’s 10-percent block and get 70 seats. On August 28, the third presidential vote was held. Now only a 50 percent majority was required, and G邦l was elected with 339 out of 550 votes. In order to prevent similar crises in the future, the government prepared in spring a proposal for a new constitution according to which the president would be elected by universal suffrage. The proposal was voted on in a referendum on October 21. a slight decline due to the right-wing Nationalist Party of Action (MHP) succeeding over the parliament’s 10-percent block and getting 70 seats. On August 28, the third presidential vote was held. Now only a 50 percent majority was required, and G邦l was elected with 339 out of 550 votes. In order to prevent similar crises in the future, the government prepared in spring a proposal for a new constitution according to which the president would be elected by universal suffrage. The proposal was voted on in a referendum on October 21. In order to prevent similar crises in the future, the government prepared in spring a proposal for a new constitution according to which the president would be elected by universal suffrage. The proposal was voted on in a referendum on October 21. In order to prevent similar crises in the future, the government prepared in spring a proposal for a new constitution according to which the president would be elected by universal suffrage. The proposal was voted on in a referendum on October 21.

Turkey Ankara Places to Visit

About 100,000 soldiers were mobilized in the spring and summer along the Iraq border and launched into attacks against the Kurdish PKK guerrilla, which had about 3,000 men in northern Iraq. Turkey and Iraq signed several agreements that Iraq would try to drive away the PKK (which, after operating under other designations, retook its original name). The clashes escalated during the fall and in December, the Turkish military conducted several air strikes in Iraqi territory and also joined ground troops. Iraq, and especially the Kurdish regional government in the north of the country, protested loudly.

Turkey’s membership negotiations with the EU slipped. In December 2006, the EU had frozen negotiations in eight of 35 negotiating chapters, but negotiations resumed in March in one chapter (business and industry) and in June another two (statistics and financial control). France stopped negotiations for another chapter (currency union). In its annual report on membership negotiations in October, the European Commission called on Turkey to speed up its reforms, particularly in the areas of freedom of expression, civilian control over the military and rights of minorities.

Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink was murdered on January 19 outside his editorial office in Istanbul. 18 suspects were arrested, among them a 17-year-old from Trabzon who was believed to have held the weapon. Shortly thereafter, images were published showing the 17-year-old proudly holding a Turkish flag along with smiling police officers. The images sparked intense debate and many police officers involved were dismissed. In October, Dink’s son, journalist Arat Dink, and a colleague were sentenced to conditional prison sentences for “offending Turkish” by publishing an interview with Hrant Dink. At the same time, Turkey called home its US ambassador for consultations since the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee had designated the events in Turkey in 1915-23, when up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed, as genocide.

On February 16, the Supreme Court sentenced seven men, two of them members of the Islamist terrorist network al-Qaeda, to life imprisonment for involvement in the blast attacks in Istanbul in 2003, which claimed 62 lives. Another 41 people were sentenced to prison for up to 15 years. On February 26, 20 members of the Turkish group Hizbullah (not to be confused with the Iran-backed guerrilla in Lebanon) were sentenced to life imprisonment for killing dozens of civilians in the 1980s and 1990s.

Three Christians – two Turks and one German – were murdered on April 18 in the city of Malatya in the southeastern part of the country.

At least 53 refugees, probably more, drowned on December 8 when a boat on its way to Greece with nearly 100 people on board capsized in severe weather outside Izmir. The refugees were Iraqis, Somalis and Palestinians. Turkey deployed a large rescue force to find survivors.

All 56 people on board died on November 30 when a McDonnell Douglas 83 aircraft crashed during a flight between Istanbul and Isparta.

Turkey weather in March, April and May

According to Bridgat.com, average daily temperatures between 6 ° C and 25 ° C can be expected over the next three months. It gets warmest in May in Antalya, while March is noticeably cooler in Van. The temperatures in Istanbul are between 12 and 22 ° C, in Ankara between 12 and 22 ° C, in Antalya between 18 and 25 ° C and in Van between 6 and 19 ° C.

Do you want to go on a beach holiday? The water temperatures are in March, April and May 8-21 ° C.

In March it rains on 7 (Antalya) to 9 days (Istanbul), in April on 5 (Antalya) to 9 days (Van) and in May on 3 (Antalya) to 9 days (Ankara).

In the period from March to May, the sun shines an average of 5 to 10 hours a day. The sunniest weather is in May in Antalya, with less sun you will have to make do with Istanbul in March.

Ankara

Aʹnkara, until 1930 Angora, the capital of Turkey; 4. 6 million residents (2015). Ankara, which is located in the interior of Asia Minor, is the capital mainly administrative, financial and commercial center. The city is also a traffic hub and has several universities. Ankara is located in an agricultural district known for its wine and sugar beet cultivation and breeding of angora (for production of mohair yarn). The industrial image is dominated by the defense industry, but also includes the textile industry and industries based on agricultural products and the automotive industry. There are also many businesses that relate to the city’s role as a management center and capital.

Cityscape and buildings

Ankara has a small historical core of oriental type. However, the majority of the city dates from the post-1923 period and has the character of a modern Western European metropolis. The main street Atatürk Bulvari is bordered by public buildings. After the Second World War, three universities and a national library were added. The city has several major theaters, state opera, ballet and philharmonic orchestra. Among the city’s museums are the archeological with world-famous collections of the Hittites.

The old Oriental neighborhood, Uluş, is located around the old citadel and is the commercial center of the city. Here is also the Ankaras oldest mosque, Alaeddin Camii, from the end of the 12th century. The new European city, Yenişehir, began to be built south of the old city center in 1928. During the Republic, Ankara has developed into an administrative and, above all, a political center. A large part of Turkey’s power elite resides here. Several of the country’s important educational institutions are also located here. At the same time, the majority of the population consists of inhabited rural residents living in slum dwellings that form entire suburbs, so-called gekekondu, on the northern and eastern outskirts of Ankaras. Nearly 60% of the population of Ankaras is estimated to reside in such neighborhoods where ethnic and religious enclaves from all over Anatolia are found. Industrialization, emissions and large population growth, largely dependent on continued migration from the countryside, contribute to widespread air pollution and major shortages in the city’s water supply.

History

Traces of settlement from the time of the Hittites (before 1200 BC) were found in Ankara, but only during the Fridays (from about 800 BC) did the resort become a city. In the 20th century BC the area came to belong to the Celts, the Galatians, immigrated to Asia Minor, and Ankara first became the seat of the tribe, then (74 BC) the capital of a kingdom and finally under the capital of Augustus in the Roman province of Galatia.

Significant ruins exist from Roman times, especially the Temple of Rome and Augustus, on whose walls the most complete copies of Augustus’ “activity report” (Res gestae divi Augusti) are preserved. In 51, Paul visited the city and then wrote the Galatians to the Christians living there.

In 1360, Ankara came under Ottoman rule, and it was there that Timur Lenk 1402 defeated and captured Sultan Bayezid. Until 1923, when the Turkish National Congress, on the proposal of Kemal Atatürk, moved the capital to Ankara, however, the place remained insignificant.